Thursday, May 21, 2020

Worldview Religion Paper - 1389 Words

APOL 104 June 2, 2014 Worldview Assignment Every human being has a worldview. They may not know exactly what that is but every person has an idea of how they think about things and what they believe in. Our worldview makes up the way we think, feel, and act upon certain issues in life. The environment in which we are raised has a lot to do with our worldview. Most people gain their way of thinking through the ways their parents think about issues in life. For example, parents can have a certain political party they align with and growing up the child can feel like they lean the same way but after learning and understanding the issues on both sides they can decide to change their minds on which party they feel best suits them.†¦show more content†¦In Christianity, the purpose of this life is to better your relationship with God and to know Him better. This is also proven in Job 22:21 that if you align yourself with God and are in harmony with that relationship that you will receive good things in this world. Morals and ethics are a major part of living life as a Christian. We ask ourselves what is the right and wrong way to live in this world. Does right and wrong even exist within this world and how do we come to understand our beliefs on the topic? Something must happen for us to come to the understanding and then what actions we must take to live the life we think we should. Christians believe that life should parallel with God’s word and aim to live the life He says we should. In Matthew 5:48 it states to be perfect because the Father is perfect. It does not mean that sin does not happen it just means to strive to attain the glorious life Christ meant for you to have. Romans 3:23 lets us know that sin has been a part of humanity since the beginning but to decide to live your life through Christ allows you the chance of forgiveness. Continuing to justify your faith in Christ leads you to the life you want and should live. Destiny is another term for fate. The questions that are often asked are what happens when I die and what will my consequences be for the life I have lived. In Christiantity, the way you have lived your lifeShow MoreRelatedAnalysis Of The Apologetics Application Of Groothuis s Christian Apologetics1447 Words   |  6 Pages APOLOGETICS APPLICATION PAPER – PART 1 SUBMISSION FORM Todd Bush APOL 500 June 5, 2016 Instructions for this submission: Part 1: Make sure you read and understand the Apologetics Application Paper Instructions document before you attempt to complete any part of this form. Attempted submissions that do not use the submission form provided will not be accepted for credit. To complete this part of the project, download this form to your computer, save it withRead MoreTaking a Look at Secular Humanism1267 Words   |  5 Pagesof thought and each worldview have a notion of God. Secular humanism is defined as a belief system where humanity is the sovereign of all beings, and where reality and information rests in science and reason. The secular humanistic worldview started as a substitute among religions. Humanism is not a religious belief system in itself, while secular means â€Å"not religious.† A religion is any system of belief that informs an individual’s worldview. The secular humanistic worldview has a distinctive beliefRead Moreapollo 500851 Words   |  4 Pagesto Apologetics Course Description This course surveys the approaches, questions, and methodologies of Christian Apologetics. The student will be exposed to the major worldviews and belief systems that they will encounter in today’s culture. Upon completion, the student will have a basic understanding of world religions, as well as the knowledge to effectively communicate the gospel with people of other faiths. Rationale Scripture tells us, â€Å"But sanctify the Lord God in your hearts, andRead MoreThe Philosophies Of Christianity And Buddhism Essay1570 Words   |  7 PagesAbsract A worldview is the way an individual understands and processes the world and reality. Worldviews can be realized by answering seven questions. Most religions have a worldview that is unique to its belief system. This paper aims to compare the worldviews of Christianity and Buddhism, and their implications on health care. Important factors regarding care provided by those of other religions will be discussed. The common components to different religions, as well as the author’s personalRead MorePersonal Worldview Inventory1710 Words   |  7 PagesPersonal Worldview Inventory Susan Anne Doy Grand Canyon University: HLT 310V October 4th 2015 Personal Worldview Inventory Each individual has a personal view of the world that has been influenced by things such as: upbringing, education, religion, life experiences and relationships. In the modern worldview, there is little thought given to the mind or soul as this is something invisible and so is not measureable. The postmodern view sees people as energy that can be manipulated to restoreRead MorePersonal Worldview Inventory. A â€Å"Worldview† Is The Term1231 Words   |  5 PagesPersonal Worldview Inventory A â€Å"worldview† is the term use to describe a complete way of viewing the world around you. Worldview differs from person to person and can be determined by religion (Grand Canyon University [GCU], 2015) or by family customs; therefore, individual’s worldview is something that was not developed over night. It is something the person has learned and believed to be true their whole life which direct the way they think, see the world around them and make decisions. With theRead MoreBiblical Worldview : The Fall, Redemption, And Restoration819 Words   |  4 PagesBiblical Worldview This paper will delve into a greater understanding of the following questions. What is the meaning of Worldview? What is meant by each of the four primary aspects of the Biblical worldview: creation, the fall, redemption and restoration? How does free enterprise comport with or reject creation, the fall, redemption, and restoration? How does socialism comport with or reject creation, the fall, redemption, and restoration? How does progressivism support or reject Biblical WorldviewRead MoreChristian Worldview Essay Paper1121 Words   |  5 PagesChristian Worldview Paper – Second Draft Christine Reiter CWV 101 – Christian World View 11/25/2012 Dr. Jim Uhley My Worldview My worldview is formed by my relationships, challenges and choices I have made, environmental surroundings and my family influence, all which have impressed on me my views of the world. According to Merriam-Webster’s Learners Dictionary, the definition of â€Å"Worldview† is â€Å"The way someone thinks about the world†. Although this simple phrase seems to the point, itRead MorePersonal Worldview Essay1009 Words   |  5 PagesPersonal Worldview Elias Cantu Grand Canyon University PHI-413V Roxanne Birchfield October 15, 2017 Personal Worldview My world view is strongly influenced by my faith, however working in the healthcare field I frequently meet individuals of different religions and faiths. A worldview is a theory of the world, used for living in the world. A world view is a mental model of reality. It is a framework of ideas and attitudes about the world, ourselves, and a comprehensive system of beliefsRead MoreEssay about HLT 310V personal worldview inventory assignment week one1242 Words   |  5 Pagesï » ¿Running head: Personal Worldview Inventory Personal Worldview Inventory Grand Canyon University Spirituality in Healthcare HLT-310V May 18, 2015 Personal Worldview Inventory There are many different meanings to the word spirituality. Spirituality can be defined in several different ways, as it pertains to different worldviews. Throughout this paper we will look at and discuss worldview as it related to pluralism, scientism, and postmodernism. Worldviews have been known to be a matter

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

The Effect of Information Technology on the Operation of...

CHAPTER ONE INTRODUCTION 1.1 BACKGROUND OF THE PROBLEM: The effect of information technology on the operation of deposit money banks in Nigeria cannot be overemphasized. New and better information technology entails that banks can add the service ‘differentiator’ to their products in a way. However, enabling tools which developed information technology can provide will make a significant effect on the operations of deposit money banks in Nigeria . The key to efficient banking lies in maximizing the use of information technology. The brave new path of tomorrow’s banking will be on the†¦show more content†¦1.5 HYPOTHESIS: The following research hypothesis have been formulated for this study: 1. Ho1: There is no significant effect on the operations of deposit money banks in Nigeria caused by the application of information technology. 2. Ho2: There is no significant effect on the customer satisfaction of deposit money banks in Nigeria caused by the application of information technology. 1.6 SCOPE AND COVERAGE OF THE STUDY: The focal point of this research study is intended to cover one deposit money bank in Nigeria ( First Bank of Nigeria plc in Enugu State) . These deposit money bank hold major shares in the banking business in Nigeria and were considered as good representatives of all commercial banks operating in Nigeria. 1.7 LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY: The limitation factor of this study include the following: 1. Inadequate study materials: This study has been limited by inadequate study materials. This is because the area is still developing and innovating in nature. 2. Time Constraints: This study is also limited by insufficient time to carry out the study. This is because ordinarily, a research study of this nature should take years for thorough observations and analysis of the effect of information technology on the operations of deposit money banks in Nigeria ,but the research study expected to be submitted at the endShow MoreRelatedAdoption of Information and Communication Technology (Ict) in the Banking Sector: Success or Failure?5916 Words   |  24 PagesADOPTION OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY (ICT) IN THE BANKING SECTOR: SUCCESS OR FAILURE? Ukeh, Moses Ichongo Superlife Consulting, Makurdi 2013 Abstract Nigerian banking industry has become highly ICT-based and is reaping the benefits of technological revolution as evidenced by its application in most of its operations. The objective of this paper was to determine if the Nigerian banks have failed or succeeded in the adoption and use of ICT (see table 2.1). An evaluation ofRead MoreThe Impact of Information and Communication Technology (Ict) on Profitability in the Nigeria Banking Industry: Focus on Some Selected Banks4006 Words   |  17 PagesTHE IMPACT OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY (ICT) ON PROFITABILITY IN THE NIGERIA BANKING INDUSTRY: FOCUS ON SOME SELECTED BANKS BY AKOMBO TERSEER SIMON BSU/MS/MBA/09/3150 A SEMINAR PAPER PRESENTED TO THE DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS MANAGEMENT, BENUE STATE UNIVERSITY, MAKURDI AUGUST, 2011 Abstract Commercial banks—assaulted by the pressures of globalization, competition from non-banking financial institutions, and volatile market dynamics—are constantly seeking new ways to add value toRead MoreThe Role of Ict in Banking Operations13419 Words   |  54 PagesTHE ROLE OF ICT IN BANKING OPERATIONS CHAPTER ONE INTRODUCTION 1.1 BACKGROUND OF THE STUDY The Nigerian banking system has undergone remarkable changes over the years, in terms of the number of institutions, ownership structure, as well as depth and breadth of operations. These changes have been influenced largely by challenges posed by deregulation of the financial sector, globalization of operations, technological innovations and adoption of supervisory and prudential requirements that conformRead MoreInformation and Communication Technology (Ict) and Banking Industry2384 Words   |  10 PagesISSN  2039†2117  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Mediterranean  Journal  of  Social  Sciences  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Vol.  2  (4)  September  2011  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and Banking Industry Alawode, Ademola John+ Emmanuel Uche Kaka** * Department of Computer Science, Federal Polytechnic Ilaro, Ogun State, Nigeria ** First Bank Nigeria PLC, Ahoada Branch, Rivers State, Nigeria. 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In Nigeria, the reforms in the banking sector preceded against the backdrop of banking crisis due to highly undercapitalization deposit taking banks; weakness in the regulatory and supervisory framework; weak management practices; and the tolerance of deficiencies in the corporate governance behaviour of banks (Uchendu, 2005). 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The Silver Linings Playbook Chapter 14 Free Essays

I Can Share Raisin Bran On the drive home from Cliff’s office I ask my mom if she thinks asking Tiffany on a date is the best way to get rid of her once and for all, and Mom says, â€Å"You shouldn’t be trying to get rid of anyone. You need friends, Pat. Everyone does. We will write a custom essay sample on The Silver Linings Playbook Chapter 14 or any similar topic only for you Order Now † I don’t say anything in response. I’m afraid Mom is rooting for me to fall in love with Tiffany, because whenever she calls Tiffany my â€Å"friend,† she says the word with a smile on her face and a hopeful look in her eye, which bothers me tremendously because Mom is the only person in my family who does not hate Nikki. Also, I know Mom looks out the window when I go on my runs, because she will tease me, saying â€Å"I see your friend showed up again† when I return from a jog. Mom pulls into the driveway, shuts off the car engine, and says, â€Å"I can loan you money should you ever want to take your friend to dinner,† and again, the way she says â€Å"friend† makes me feel tingly in a bad way. I say nothing in response, and my mother does the strangest thing – she giggles. I finish my weight training for the day and put on a trash bag, and as I begin stretching on the front lawn, I see that Tiffany is jogging up and down the length of my parents’ block, waiting for me to begin running. I tell myself to ask her out to dinner so I can end this madness and get back to being alone on my runs, but instead I simply start running, and Tiffany follows. I go past the high school, down Collings Avenue to the Black Horse Pike, make a left and then another left into Oaklyn, run down Kendall Boulevard to the Oaklyn Public School, up past the Manor Bar to the White Horse Pike, make a right and then a left onto Cuthbert, and I run into Westmont. When I get to the Crystal Lake Diner, I turn and jog in place. Tiffany jogs in place and stares at her feet. â€Å"Hey,† I say to her. â€Å"You want to have dinner with me at this diner?† â€Å"Tonight?† she says without looking up at me. â€Å"Yeah.† â€Å"What time?† â€Å"We have to walk here because I’m not allowed to drive.† â€Å"What time?† â€Å"I’ll be in front of your house at seven-thirty.† Next, the most amazing thing happens: Tiffany simply jogs away from me, and I cannot believe I finally got her to leave me alone. I am so happy I alter my route and run at least fifteen miles instead of ten, and when the sun sets, the clouds in the west are all lined with electricity, which I know is a good omen. At home, I tell my mother I need some money so I can take Tiffany out to dinner. My mother tries to hide her smile as she retrieves her purse from the kitchen table. â€Å"Where are you taking her?† â€Å"The Crystal Lake Diner.† â€Å"You shouldn’t need more than forty dollars then, right?† â€Å"I guess.† â€Å"It’ll be on the counter when you come down.† I shower, apply underarm deodorant, use my father’s cologne, and put on my khakis and the dark green button-down shirt Mom bought me at the Gap just yesterday. For some reason, my mother is systematically buying an entire wardrobe for me – and every piece is from the Gap. When I go downstairs, my mom tells me I need to tuck in my shirt and wear a belt. â€Å"Why?† I ask, because I do not really care if I look respectable or not. I only want to get rid of Tiffany once and for all. But when Mom says, â€Å"Please,† I remember that I am trying to be kind instead of right – and I also owe Mom because she rescued me from the bad place – so I go upstairs and put on the brown leather belt she purchased for me earlier in the week. Mom comes into my room with a shoe box and says, â€Å"Put on some dress socks and try these on.† I open the box, and these swanky-looking brown leather loafers are inside. â€Å"Jake said these are what men your age wear casually,† Mom says. When I slip the loafers on and look in the mirror, I see how thin my waistline appears, and I think I look almost as swanky as my little brother. With forty bucks in my pocket, I walk across Knight’s Park to Tiffany’s parents’ house. She is outside, waiting for me on the sidewalk, but I see her mother peeking out the window. Mrs. Webster ducks behind the blinds when we make eye contact. Tiffany does not say hello, but begins walking before I can stop. She is wearing a pink knee-length skirt and a black summer sweater. Her platform sandals make her look taller, and her hair is sort of puffed out around the ears, hanging down to her shoulders. Her eyeliner is a little heavy, and her lips are so pink, but I have to admit she looks great, which I tell her, saying, â€Å"Wow, you look really nice tonight.† â€Å"I like your shoes,† she says in response, and then we walk for thirty minutes without saying another word. We get a booth at the diner, and the server gives us glasses of water. Tiffany orders tea, and I say that water is fine for me. As I read the menu, I worry that I won’t have enough money, which is silly, I know, because I have two twenties on me and most of the entrees are under ten bucks, but I do not know what Tiffany will order, and maybe she will want dessert, and then there’s the tip. Nikki taught me to overtip; she says waitresses work too hard for such a little bit of money. Nikki knows this because she was a waitress all through college – when we were at La Salle – so I always overtip when I go out to eat now, just to make up for the times in the past when I fought with Nikki over a few dollars, saying fifteen percent was more than enough, because no one tipped me regardless of whether I did my job well or not. Now I am a believer in overtipping, because I am practicing being kind rather than right – and as I am reading the diner menu, I think, What if I do not have enough money left over for a generous tip? I am worrying about all of this so much that I must have missed Tiffany’s order, because suddenly the waitress is saying, â€Å"Sir?† When I put my menu down, both Tiffany and the waitress are staring at me, as if they are concerned. So I say, â€Å"Raisin bran,† because I remember reading that cereal is only $2.25. â€Å"Milk?† â€Å"How much is milk?† â€Å"Seventy-five cents.† I figure I can afford it, so I say, â€Å"Please,† and then hand my menu back to the waitress. â€Å"That’s it?† I nod, and the waitress sighs audibly before leaving us alone. â€Å"What did you order? I didn’t catch it,† I say to Tiffany, trying to sound polite but secretly worrying that I will not have enough money left over for a good tip. â€Å"Just tea,† she says, and then we both look out the window at the cars in the parking lot. When the raisin bran comes, I open the little single-serving box and pour the cereal into the bowl the diner provides free of charge. The milk comes in a miniature pitcher; I pour it over the brown flakes and sugared raisins. I push the bowl to the middle of the table and ask Tiffany if she would like to help me eat the cereal. â€Å"Are you sure?† she says, and when I nod, she picks up her spoon and we eat. When we get the bill, it is for $4.59. I hand our waitress the two twenties, and the woman laughs, shakes her head, and says, â€Å"Change?† When I say, â€Å"No, thank you† – thinking Nikki would want me to overtip – the waitress says to Tiffany, â€Å"Honey, I had him all wrong. You two come back real soon. Okay?† And I can tell the woman is satisfied with her tip because she sort of skips her way to the register. Tiffany doesn’t say anything on the walk home, so I don’t either. When we get to her house, I tell her I had a great time. â€Å"Thanks,† I say, and then offer a handshake, just so Tiffany will not get the wrong idea. She looks at my hand and then up at me, but she doesn’t shake. For a second I think she is going to start crying again, but instead she says, â€Å"Remember when I said you could fuck me?† I nod slowly because I wish I did not remember it so vividly. â€Å"I don’t want you to fuck me, Pat. Okay?† â€Å"Okay,† I say. She walks around her parents’ house, and then I am alone again. When I arrive home, my mom excitedly asks me what we had for dinner, and when I tell her raisin bran, she laughs and says, â€Å"Really, what did you have?† I ignore her, go to my room, and lock the door. Lying down on my bed, I pick up the picture of Nikki and tell her all about my date and how I gave the waitress a nice tip and how sad Tiffany seems and how much I can’t wait for apart time to end so Nikki and I can share raisin bran at some diner and walk through the cool early September air – and then I am crying again. I bury my face and sob into my pillow so my parents will not hear. How to cite The Silver Linings Playbook Chapter 14, Essay examples

Sunday, April 26, 2020

Prohibition Essays (619 words) - Prohibition In The United States

Prohibition Prohibition One of the most controversial, the Eighteenth, and later, its repeal, the Tweny-First amendment, made a big impact on America, and their ideas are still talked about today. Prohibition has had many different view points from the beginning. Prohibition started long before the Eighteenth Amendment. Organizations against alcohol such as the Anti-Saloon League and the Woman's Christian Temperance Union were succeeding in enacting local prohibition laws, turning the campaign into a national effort. In the late 1900s there was an average of one saloon for every 150 to 200 people, including nondrinkers, due to competition in brewing companies. The major complaint was the sex and gambling that went along with the saloons. Originally it was started as awartime austerity measure in 1917, and later Congress proposed the Eighteenth Amendment. According to Dennis Mahoney, in 1919, it was ratified and went into effect. The Volstead act was sponsored by Andrew J.Volstead on October 28, 1919. It enforced the new Amendment. During Prohibition there was a slight drop in homicide rates around the country. On January 16, 1920, the great law went into effect. The Eighteenth amendment made it forbidden to manufacture, sell, transport, import or export any intoxicating liquors. This was controversial because it turned the common hard working man or woman, who enjoyed a drink after a hard day's work, into a criminal in the law's eyes. In The History of Prohibiton, a web site by J. McGrew, it states that Prohibiton also gave criminals, such as Al Capone, the opportunity to feed off the illegal substance. The organized crime circuit ate up Prohibition and began to boot leg alcohol. Local pharmacies and basements near the border became hubs for the transactions. The Big Bosses would purchase it in Canada, where it was legal and import it to the US. A prime example of the organized crime is in the movie, Legends of the Fall. Both the Volstead Act and the Eighteenth Amendment a re mentioned in the movie, as it portrays a small time boot legger going up against a big organized crime family, in the end many people lost their lives over alcohol and money. Speakeasies, illegal bars, sprang up everywhere. They promoted the worst of immorality, sex and gambling, as well as drinking. And for the first time women were seen smoking in public. Bathtub gin and other illegal brewing was everywhere. Not only was the home made booze highly potent it could also be highly fatal. If you survived, you could very well be blind or disabled from bad rot gut. I recently spoke to my grandfather on the issue and he was quoted to say Oh sure, we brewed our own beer and wine, we didn't care. The public was fed up. Well-organized groups like the Woman's Organization for National Prohibition Reform grew rapidly and after thirteen years it exploded during the 1932 presidential campaign. The democrats and their delegate, Senator, Franklin D. Roosevelt, supported the reform. Backed by t he Voluntary Committee of Lawyers, Roosevelt got the repeal. On February 20, 1933, the Twenty-First Amendment was proposed and on December 5, it was ratified. The newest Amendment to the Constitution repealed the Eighteenth Amendment and the Volstead Act. After its repeal it took a long time for the consumption rate of Alcohol to get back to the pre-Prohibition level. In closing, the Noble Experiment (a name for Prohibiton, found in many different sources) failed. The evidence clearly shows that the conditions of the Nation were clearly better without Prohibition and the Eighteenth Amendment. One of the most discussed and debated of this century, will this issue be carried into the next on the back of Marijuana? History Essays

Wednesday, March 18, 2020

An analysis on How Human Behaviour is shaped by Life Philosophies and Well Being

An analysis on How Human Behaviour is shaped by Life Philosophies and Well Being â€Å"Is Life Nasty, Brutish, and Short? Philosophies of Life and Well-Being† (Aknin, Arikm, Dunn Norton 2011) addresses how the general public supports Hobbes’s view that life is short and hard (Kant, 1983) impacting well-being and civic involvement of individuals. The authors based their research on the notion that civic organizations were necessary in protecting the people’s well-being given their brutish nature.Advertising We will write a custom critical writing sample on An analysis on How Human Behaviour is shaped by Life Philosophies and Well Being specifically for you for only $16.05 $11/page Learn More The article explores Hobbes’s view in association with lower happiness, the relationship of life philosophies to civic engagement and subjective life beliefs shape people’s participation in the world. The authors conducted surveys in testing out their hypothesis asking questions on participants’ outlook in li fe, philosophies and beliefs. They recruited random people from different parts of the world with diverse life experiences and principles. In defining their key variables they asked different sets of questions for each study. The study proved that people who saw life as short and hard are least happy, have less engagement in civic duties and saw themselves experiencing bad events from the past recurring in the future. The authors were able to solidify their claims through the results of their experiments. By conducting random surveys, the authors were able to create a platform of fairness by eradicating biases that may occur among their critics. The research indicates that human behaviour in general is relative to individual’s personal philosophy. The study shows that a person’s well-being is closely associated with his personal outlook in life and how he lives it. Human behaviour is shaped by such philosophy resulting to his involvement in the society. In conducting t he study since philosophies were discussed, why was religion not included in the survey? References Aknin L.B. , Dunn E.W. , Norton M.I. Arikm L. (2011). Is Life Nasty, Brutish, and Short? Philosophies of Life and Well-Being. Social Psychological and Personality Science. Kant, I. (1795/1983). Perpetual peace and other essays on politics, history, and morals (Ted Humphrey, Trans.). Indianapolis, IN: Hackett Publishing.Advertising Looking for critical writing on psychology? Let's see if we can help you! Get your first paper with 15% OFF Learn More

Monday, March 2, 2020

Pulque, Ancient Mesoamerican Sacred Drink

Pulque, Ancient Mesoamerican Sacred Drink Pulque is a viscous, milk-colored, alcoholic beverage produced by fermenting the sap obtained by the maguey plant. Until the 19th and 20th century, it was probably the most widespread alcoholic beverage in Mexico. In ancient Mesoamerica pulque was a beverage restricted to certain groups of people and to certain occasions. The consumption of pulque was linked to feasting and ritual ceremonies, and many Mesoamerican cultures produced a rich iconography illustrating the production and consumption of this beverage. The Aztec called this beverage ixtac octli which means white liquor. The name pulque is probably a corruption of the term octli poliuhqui, or over-fermented or spoiled liquor. Pulque Production The juicy sap, or aguamiel, is extracted from the plant. An agave plant is productive for up to a year and,  usually, the sap is collected twice a day. Neither fermented pulque nor the straight aguamiel can be stored for a  long time; the liquor needs to be consumed quickly and even the processing place needs to be close to the field. The fermentation starts in the plant itself  since the microorganisms occurring naturally in the maguey plant start the process of transforming the sugar into alcohol. The fermented sap was traditionally collected using dried bottle gourds, and it was then poured into large ceramic jars where the seeds of the plant were added to accelerate the fermentation process. Among the Aztecs/Mexica, pulque was a highly desired item, obtained through tribute. Many codices refer to the importance of this drink for nobility and priests, and its role in Aztec economy. Pulque Consumption In ancient Mesoamerica, pulque was consumed during feasting or ritual ceremonies and was also offered to the gods. Its consumption was strictly regulated. Ritual drunkenness was allowed only by priests and warriors, and commoners were permitted to drink it only during certain occasions. Elderly and occasionally pregnant woman were allowed to drink it. In the Quetzalcoatl myth, the god is tricked into drinking pulque and his drunkenness caused him to be banished and exiled from his land. According to indigenous and colonial sources, different types of pulque existed, often flavored with other ingredients such as chili peppers. Pulque Imagery Pulque is depicted in Mesoamerican iconography as white foam emerging from small, rounded pots and vessels. A small stick, similar to a straw, is often depicted within the drinking pot, probably representing a stirring instrument used to produce the foam. Images of pulque-making are recorded in many codices, murals and even rock carvings, such as the ball court at El Tajin. One of the most famous representations of the pulque drinking ceremony is at the pyramid of Cholula, in Central Mexico. The Mural of the Drinkers In 1969, a 180 feet long mural was discovered by accident in the pyramid of Cholula. The collapse of a wall exposed part of the mural buried at a depth of almost 25 feet. The mural, dubbed the Mural of the Drinkers, portrays a feasting scene with figures wearing elaborate turbans and masks drinking pulque and performing other ritual activities. It has been suggested that the scene portrays pulque deities. The origin of pulque is narrated in many myths, most of them linked to the goddess of maguey, Mayahuel. Other deities directly related to pulque were the got Mixcoatl and the Centzon Totochtin (the 400 rabbits), sons of Mayahuel associated with the pulque’s effects. Sources Bye, Robert A., and Edelmina Linares, 2001, Pulque, in The Oxford Encyclopedia of Mesoamerican Cultures, vol. 1, edited by David Carrasco, Oxford University Press.pp: 38-40 Taube, Karl, 1996, Las Origines del Pulque, Arqueologà ­a Mexicana, 4 (20): 71

Saturday, February 15, 2020

Regional policing Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 500 words

Regional policing - Essay Example A recent manual promoting regional policing cites seven advantages of regional policing as compared to the previous system of devolved units: i) Improvement in the Uniformity and Consistency of Police Enforcement, ii) Improvements in the Coordination of Law Enforcement Services, iii) Improvement in the Distribution and Deployment of Police Personnel, iv) Improvement in Training and Personnel Efficiency, v) Improved Police Management and Supervision, vi) Reduced Costs and vii) Improved Career Enhancement Opportunities for Police Officers. (Regional Police Services, 2011, pp. 3-4). There are also some accepted disadvantages and these are a) Loss of Local Non-enforcement Services, b) Loss of Local Control and c) Loss of Citizen Contact. A close analysis of the advantages reveals that the main beneficiaries of regional policing are the government departments, and of course the taxpayers who fund them, because regional policing reduces costs and makes efficiency gains. It could also be argued that more uniformity and consistency, along with better management and supervision of personnel results in a fairer and more effective police force, which again benefits the taxpayer. The creation of bigger units of service delivery also benefits police personnel, because there is a greater potential to move sideways to try different roles and gain more experience, and to apply for promotion. The downside of emphasizing regional policing over local or community policing, is that some traditional practices, such as the use of police for particular local non-law enforcement functions, such as those related to parking and permits, may no longer involve police. This removes the reassurance of police presence from the public space, and results in lower visibility and perhaps also a reduced linkage between the local people and their police force. In a way regional policing